RIP Thread

It's all a load of Cannonballs in here! This is the virtual Arsenal pub where you can chat about anything except football. Be warned though, like any pub, the content may not always be suitable for everyone.
BobbyPires7
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by BobbyPires7 »

DB10GOONER wrote:
Tue Sep 13, 2022 8:54 am
BobbyPires7 wrote:
Mon Sep 12, 2022 1:46 pm
My Dad died from brain cancer last week. A through-and-through Gooner for his entire life. Worked the turnstiles at Highbury back in the 80s. Season ticket holder right up until the move to the Emirates. Devastated is an understatement.

Rest in Peace Dad. x
Ah Jesus. I'm so sorry to hear that man. I lost my dad to that terrible disease 14 years ago and know exactly what you are going through. It will hurt terribly for a long time but you will get through it and the pain will eventually turn into a kind of strange warm nostalgic sadness where you remember the good times and the good things about him without it hurting so much.

Sounds like your dad was a top bloke, raised you a Gooner, and loved his club. Alot to be thankful for there.

May he rest in peace.
Thanks mate.

wilson2.0
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by wilson2.0 »

Anyone protesting the funeral proceedings should be arrested. "oh its free speech', yeah knob you've come to a gathering of people mourning the death of the Sovreign, you're clearly trying to antagonize people. Why would you want to push your views on people who are clearly staunch monarchists?

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goonersid
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by goonersid »

wilson2.0 wrote:
Thu Sep 15, 2022 9:49 am
Anyone protesting the funeral proceedings should be arrested. "oh its free speech', yeah knob you've come to a gathering of people mourning the death of the Sovreign, you're clearly trying to antagonize people. Why would you want to push your views on people who are clearly staunch monarchists?
Why!!

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DB10GOONER
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by DB10GOONER »

wilson2.0 wrote:
Thu Sep 15, 2022 9:49 am
Anyone protesting the funeral proceedings should be arrested. "oh its free speech', yeah knob you've come to a gathering of people mourning the death of the Sovreign, you're clearly trying to antagonize people. Why would you want to push your views on people who are clearly staunch monarchists?
Get a grip ffs mate. :lol:

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KingHenry
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by KingHenry »

wilson2.0 wrote:
Thu Sep 15, 2022 9:49 am
Anyone protesting the funeral proceedings should be arrested. "oh its free speech', yeah knob you've come to a gathering of people mourning the death of the Sovreign, you're clearly trying to antagonize people. Why would you want to push your views on people who are clearly staunch monarchists?
Move to North Korea

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OneBardGooner
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by OneBardGooner »

KingHenry wrote:
Fri Sep 16, 2022 8:07 pm
wilson2.0 wrote:
Thu Sep 15, 2022 9:49 am
Anyone protesting the funeral proceedings should be arrested. "oh its free speech', yeah knob you've come to a gathering of people mourning the death of the Sovreign, you're clearly trying to antagonize people. Why would you want to push your views on people who are clearly staunch monarchists?
Move to North Korea
Image


:mrgreen:

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OneBardGooner
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by OneBardGooner »

Great Escape prisoner Vyvyan Howard, dies aged 102

From the BBC.


:hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

Vyvyan Howard
Image
Vyvyan Howard celebrated his 100th birthday in 2019

A World War 2 pilot, who was a prisoner of war at the camp made famous by the film The Great Escape, has died aged 102.

Captain Vyvyan Howard, from Banbury, was captured and held at the German Stalag Luft III camp after his plane was shot down in 1941.
During that time, he aided attempts to dig tunnels under the perimeter fences.

His family paid tribute to his "quiet wisdom" following his death at a nursing home in Banbury, Oxfordshire.
Mr Howard joined the Royal Navy as a pilot shortly before the start of World War 2 and was shot down and captured in the ill-fated Kirkenes raid in the north of Norway.

Vyvyan Howard

Image

Captain Howard had 36 years' service with the Royal Navy before his retirement
He spent two-and-a-half years at the Nazis' Stalag Luft III POW camp in Lower Silesia, now part of Poland.

During that time, he helped in escape attempts immortalised in the films, The Wooden Horse and the Great Escape.

In the wooden horse attempt, he and others continuously jumped over a vaulting horse which covered the trap door to an escape tunnel.
While not among those who made it clear of the camp during the 1944 Great Escape, he used his fluent German to engage the guards in conversation to distract them from covert digging of tunnels - codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry.
In January 1945 the camp was marched westward in treacherous winter conditions in the so-called Long March, before being liberated by British forces at Lubeck in May.

Vyvyan Howard
Image
This photograph shows the moment Vyvyan Howard and others were captured in 1941

Mr Howard later said he owed his life to advice from a Polish soldier who told him "don't ever take your boots off", to prevent his feet from swelling.
After the war, he continued his career in the Fleet Air Arm after the war and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for gallantry during the Suez Crisis.
His knowledge of Polish, picked up in the POW camp, led him to become a naval translator and he eventually became the British Naval Attaché in Bonn, West Germany.

Recalling his wartime experiences on his 100th birthday in 2019 he said: "It was bloody awful but you were in it and that was it - you couldn't just walk out of the door."

His son, also called Vyvyan, said: "In common with a lot of people of that generation, a lot of the war experiences only came out later in life.
"He had a quiet wisdom - family came first. He was a wonderful man," he added.

A funeral service for Captain Howard is due to be held at Mollington Parish Church on 30 September.

The Great Escape

Stalag Luft III opened in spring 1942, and held air forces personnel only
At its height it held 10,000 prisoners of war, covered 59 acres and had five miles (8km) of perimeter fencing
Some 600 prisoners helped dig three tunnels, which were referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry
The "Great Escape" happened on the night of 24 to 25 March, 1944
Seventy-six men attempted a getaway through tunnel Harry, which was 102m (336ft) long and 8.5m deep
Seventy-three of them were recaptured by the Germans within three days. Fifty were executed on Hitler's orders
Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough later stared in the film, The Great Escape, released in 1963

John F
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Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2015 2:41 pm

Re: RIP Thread

Post by John F »

OneBardGooner wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:15 pm
Great Escape prisoner Vyvyan Howard, dies aged 102


:hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

Vyvyan Howard
Image
Vyvyan Howard celebrated his 100th birthday in 2019

A World War 2 pilot, who was a prisoner of war at the camp made famous by the film The Great Escape, has died aged 102.

Captain Vyvyan Howard, from Banbury, was captured and held at the German Stalag Luft III camp after his plane was shot down in 1941.
During that time, he aided attempts to dig tunnels under the perimeter fences.

His family paid tribute to his "quiet wisdom" following his death at a nursing home in Banbury, Oxfordshire.
Mr Howard joined the Royal Navy as a pilot shortly before the start of World War 2 and was shot down and captured in the ill-fated Kirkenes raid in the north of Norway.

Vyvyan Howard

Image

Captain Howard had 36 years' service with the Royal Navy before his retirement
He spent two-and-a-half years at the Nazis' Stalag Luft III POW camp in Lower Silesia, now part of Poland.

During that time, he helped in escape attempts immortalised in the films, The Wooden Horse and the Great Escape.

In the wooden horse attempt, he and others continuously jumped over a vaulting horse which covered the trap door to an escape tunnel.
While not among those who made it clear of the camp during the 1944 Great Escape, he used his fluent German to engage the guards in conversation to distract them from covert digging of tunnels - codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry.
In January 1945 the camp was marched westward in treacherous winter conditions in the so-called Long March, before being liberated by British forces at Lubeck in May.

Vyvyan Howard
Image
This photograph shows the moment Vyvyan Howard and others were captured in 1941

Mr Howard later said he owed his life to advice from a Polish soldier who told him "don't ever take your boots off", to prevent his feet from swelling.
After the war, he continued his career in the Fleet Air Arm after the war and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for gallantry during the Suez Crisis.
His knowledge of Polish, picked up in the POW camp, led him to become a naval translator and he eventually became the British Naval Attaché in Bonn, West Germany.

Recalling his wartime experiences on his 100th birthday in 2019 he said: "It was bloody awful but you were in it and that was it - you couldn't just walk out of the door."

His son, also called Vyvyan, said: "In common with a lot of people of that generation, a lot of the war experiences only came out later in life.
"He had a quiet wisdom - family came first. He was a wonderful man," he added.

A funeral service for Captain Howard is due to be held at Mollington Parish Church on 30 September.

The Great Escape

Stalag Luft III opened in spring 1942, and held air forces personnel only
At its height it held 10,000 prisoners of war, covered 59 acres and had five miles (8km) of perimeter fencing
Some 600 prisoners helped dig three tunnels, which were referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry
The "Great Escape" happened on the night of 24 to 25 March, 1944
Seventy-six men attempted a getaway through tunnel Harry, which was 102m (336ft) long and 8.5m deep
Seventy-three of them were recaptured by the Germans within three days. Fifty were executed on Hitler's orders
Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough later stared in the film, The Great Escape, released in 1963
Great write up OB

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DB10GOONER
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by DB10GOONER »

OneBardGooner wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:15 pm
Great Escape prisoner Vyvyan Howard, dies aged 102


:hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

Vyvyan Howard
Image
Vyvyan Howard celebrated his 100th birthday in 2019

A World War 2 pilot, who was a prisoner of war at the camp made famous by the film The Great Escape, has died aged 102.

Captain Vyvyan Howard, from Banbury, was captured and held at the German Stalag Luft III camp after his plane was shot down in 1941.
During that time, he aided attempts to dig tunnels under the perimeter fences.

His family paid tribute to his "quiet wisdom" following his death at a nursing home in Banbury, Oxfordshire.
Mr Howard joined the Royal Navy as a pilot shortly before the start of World War 2 and was shot down and captured in the ill-fated Kirkenes raid in the north of Norway.

Vyvyan Howard

Image

Captain Howard had 36 years' service with the Royal Navy before his retirement
He spent two-and-a-half years at the Nazis' Stalag Luft III POW camp in Lower Silesia, now part of Poland.

During that time, he helped in escape attempts immortalised in the films, The Wooden Horse and the Great Escape.

In the wooden horse attempt, he and others continuously jumped over a vaulting horse which covered the trap door to an escape tunnel.
While not among those who made it clear of the camp during the 1944 Great Escape, he used his fluent German to engage the guards in conversation to distract them from covert digging of tunnels - codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry.
In January 1945 the camp was marched westward in treacherous winter conditions in the so-called Long March, before being liberated by British forces at Lubeck in May.

Vyvyan Howard
Image
This photograph shows the moment Vyvyan Howard and others were captured in 1941

Mr Howard later said he owed his life to advice from a Polish soldier who told him "don't ever take your boots off", to prevent his feet from swelling.
After the war, he continued his career in the Fleet Air Arm after the war and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for gallantry during the Suez Crisis.
His knowledge of Polish, picked up in the POW camp, led him to become a naval translator and he eventually became the British Naval Attaché in Bonn, West Germany.

Recalling his wartime experiences on his 100th birthday in 2019 he said: "It was bloody awful but you were in it and that was it - you couldn't just walk out of the door."

His son, also called Vyvyan, said: "In common with a lot of people of that generation, a lot of the war experiences only came out later in life.
"He had a quiet wisdom - family came first. He was a wonderful man," he added.

A funeral service for Captain Howard is due to be held at Mollington Parish Church on 30 September.

The Great Escape

Stalag Luft III opened in spring 1942, and held air forces personnel only
At its height it held 10,000 prisoners of war, covered 59 acres and had five miles (8km) of perimeter fencing
Some 600 prisoners helped dig three tunnels, which were referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry
The "Great Escape" happened on the night of 24 to 25 March, 1944
Seventy-six men attempted a getaway through tunnel Harry, which was 102m (336ft) long and 8.5m deep
Seventy-three of them were recaptured by the Germans within three days. Fifty were executed on Hitler's orders
Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough later stared in the film, The Great Escape, released in 1963
Great read, OneBard mate - but if you didn't write it you need to put up a link to the original or credit the author. Cheers. 8)

It's sad to think that entire generation that fought the nazi scum are nearly all gone now. :(

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OneBardGooner
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by OneBardGooner »

Sorry mate I usually cite the source. It was from BBC (That's British Broadcasting Corporation, not the BBC site that our Rodders likes visiting! :D :wink:

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OneBardGooner
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by OneBardGooner »

John F wrote:
Thu Sep 22, 2022 6:04 pm
OneBardGooner wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:15 pm
Great Escape prisoner Vyvyan Howard, dies aged 102


:hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

Vyvyan Howard
Image
Vyvyan Howard celebrated his 100th birthday in 2019

A World War 2 pilot, who was a prisoner of war at the camp made famous by the film The Great Escape, has died aged 102.

Captain Vyvyan Howard, from Banbury, was captured and held at the German Stalag Luft III camp after his plane was shot down in 1941.
During that time, he aided attempts to dig tunnels under the perimeter fences.

His family paid tribute to his "quiet wisdom" following his death at a nursing home in Banbury, Oxfordshire.
Mr Howard joined the Royal Navy as a pilot shortly before the start of World War 2 and was shot down and captured in the ill-fated Kirkenes raid in the north of Norway.

Vyvyan Howard

Image

Captain Howard had 36 years' service with the Royal Navy before his retirement
He spent two-and-a-half years at the Nazis' Stalag Luft III POW camp in Lower Silesia, now part of Poland.

During that time, he helped in escape attempts immortalised in the films, The Wooden Horse and the Great Escape.

In the wooden horse attempt, he and others continuously jumped over a vaulting horse which covered the trap door to an escape tunnel.
While not among those who made it clear of the camp during the 1944 Great Escape, he used his fluent German to engage the guards in conversation to distract them from covert digging of tunnels - codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry.
In January 1945 the camp was marched westward in treacherous winter conditions in the so-called Long March, before being liberated by British forces at Lubeck in May.

Vyvyan Howard
Image
This photograph shows the moment Vyvyan Howard and others were captured in 1941

Mr Howard later said he owed his life to advice from a Polish soldier who told him "don't ever take your boots off", to prevent his feet from swelling.
After the war, he continued his career in the Fleet Air Arm after the war and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for gallantry during the Suez Crisis.
His knowledge of Polish, picked up in the POW camp, led him to become a naval translator and he eventually became the British Naval Attaché in Bonn, West Germany.

Recalling his wartime experiences on his 100th birthday in 2019 he said: "It was bloody awful but you were in it and that was it - you couldn't just walk out of the door."

His son, also called Vyvyan, said: "In common with a lot of people of that generation, a lot of the war experiences only came out later in life.
"He had a quiet wisdom - family came first. He was a wonderful man," he added.

A funeral service for Captain Howard is due to be held at Mollington Parish Church on 30 September.

The Great Escape

Stalag Luft III opened in spring 1942, and held air forces personnel only
At its height it held 10,000 prisoners of war, covered 59 acres and had five miles (8km) of perimeter fencing
Some 600 prisoners helped dig three tunnels, which were referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry
The "Great Escape" happened on the night of 24 to 25 March, 1944
Seventy-six men attempted a getaway through tunnel Harry, which was 102m (336ft) long and 8.5m deep
Seventy-three of them were recaptured by the Germans within three days. Fifty were executed on Hitler's orders
Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough later stared in the film, The Great Escape, released in 1963
Great write up OB
:oops: Cut n pasted from BBC. :|

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StuartL
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by StuartL »

OneBardGooner wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:15 pm
Great Escape prisoner Vyvyan Howard, dies aged 102


:hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

Vyvyan Howard
Image
Vyvyan Howard celebrated his 100th birthday in 2019

A World War 2 pilot, who was a prisoner of war at the camp made famous by the film The Great Escape, has died aged 102.

Captain Vyvyan Howard, from Banbury, was captured and held at the German Stalag Luft III camp after his plane was shot down in 1941.
During that time, he aided attempts to dig tunnels under the perimeter fences.

His family paid tribute to his "quiet wisdom" following his death at a nursing home in Banbury, Oxfordshire.
Mr Howard joined the Royal Navy as a pilot shortly before the start of World War 2 and was shot down and captured in the ill-fated Kirkenes raid in the north of Norway.

Vyvyan Howard

Image

Captain Howard had 36 years' service with the Royal Navy before his retirement
He spent two-and-a-half years at the Nazis' Stalag Luft III POW camp in Lower Silesia, now part of Poland.

During that time, he helped in escape attempts immortalised in the films, The Wooden Horse and the Great Escape.

In the wooden horse attempt, he and others continuously jumped over a vaulting horse which covered the trap door to an escape tunnel.
While not among those who made it clear of the camp during the 1944 Great Escape, he used his fluent German to engage the guards in conversation to distract them from covert digging of tunnels - codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry.
In January 1945 the camp was marched westward in treacherous winter conditions in the so-called Long March, before being liberated by British forces at Lubeck in May.

Vyvyan Howard
Image
This photograph shows the moment Vyvyan Howard and others were captured in 1941

Mr Howard later said he owed his life to advice from a Polish soldier who told him "don't ever take your boots off", to prevent his feet from swelling.
After the war, he continued his career in the Fleet Air Arm after the war and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for gallantry during the Suez Crisis.
His knowledge of Polish, picked up in the POW camp, led him to become a naval translator and he eventually became the British Naval Attaché in Bonn, West Germany.

Recalling his wartime experiences on his 100th birthday in 2019 he said: "It was bloody awful but you were in it and that was it - you couldn't just walk out of the door."

His son, also called Vyvyan, said: "In common with a lot of people of that generation, a lot of the war experiences only came out later in life.
"He had a quiet wisdom - family came first. He was a wonderful man," he added.

A funeral service for Captain Howard is due to be held at Mollington Parish Church on 30 September.

The Great Escape

Stalag Luft III opened in spring 1942, and held air forces personnel only
At its height it held 10,000 prisoners of war, covered 59 acres and had five miles (8km) of perimeter fencing
Some 600 prisoners helped dig three tunnels, which were referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry
The "Great Escape" happened on the night of 24 to 25 March, 1944
Seventy-six men attempted a getaway through tunnel Harry, which was 102m (336ft) long and 8.5m deep
Seventy-three of them were recaptured by the Germans within three days. Fifty were executed on Hitler's orders
Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough later stared in the film, The Great Escape, released in 1963
What a guy :bowing21: :bowing21:

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DB10GOONER
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Location: Dublin, Ireland.
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by DB10GOONER »

OneBardGooner wrote:
Thu Sep 22, 2022 8:44 pm
Sorry mate I usually cite the source. It was from BBC (That's British Broadcasting Corporation, not the BBC site that our Rodders likes visiting! :D :wink:
No probs mate and thanks! 8)

John F
Posts: 943
Joined: Sat Apr 18, 2015 2:41 pm

Re: RIP Thread

Post by John F »

OneBardGooner wrote:
Thu Sep 22, 2022 8:44 pm
John F wrote:
Thu Sep 22, 2022 6:04 pm
OneBardGooner wrote:
Tue Sep 20, 2022 9:15 pm
Great Escape prisoner Vyvyan Howard, dies aged 102


:hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail: :hail:

Vyvyan Howard
Image
Vyvyan Howard celebrated his 100th birthday in 2019

A World War 2 pilot, who was a prisoner of war at the camp made famous by the film The Great Escape, has died aged 102.

Captain Vyvyan Howard, from Banbury, was captured and held at the German Stalag Luft III camp after his plane was shot down in 1941.
During that time, he aided attempts to dig tunnels under the perimeter fences.

His family paid tribute to his "quiet wisdom" following his death at a nursing home in Banbury, Oxfordshire.
Mr Howard joined the Royal Navy as a pilot shortly before the start of World War 2 and was shot down and captured in the ill-fated Kirkenes raid in the north of Norway.

Vyvyan Howard

Image

Captain Howard had 36 years' service with the Royal Navy before his retirement
He spent two-and-a-half years at the Nazis' Stalag Luft III POW camp in Lower Silesia, now part of Poland.

During that time, he helped in escape attempts immortalised in the films, The Wooden Horse and the Great Escape.

In the wooden horse attempt, he and others continuously jumped over a vaulting horse which covered the trap door to an escape tunnel.
While not among those who made it clear of the camp during the 1944 Great Escape, he used his fluent German to engage the guards in conversation to distract them from covert digging of tunnels - codenamed Tom, Dick and Harry.
In January 1945 the camp was marched westward in treacherous winter conditions in the so-called Long March, before being liberated by British forces at Lubeck in May.

Vyvyan Howard
Image
This photograph shows the moment Vyvyan Howard and others were captured in 1941

Mr Howard later said he owed his life to advice from a Polish soldier who told him "don't ever take your boots off", to prevent his feet from swelling.
After the war, he continued his career in the Fleet Air Arm after the war and was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross (DSC) for gallantry during the Suez Crisis.
His knowledge of Polish, picked up in the POW camp, led him to become a naval translator and he eventually became the British Naval Attaché in Bonn, West Germany.

Recalling his wartime experiences on his 100th birthday in 2019 he said: "It was bloody awful but you were in it and that was it - you couldn't just walk out of the door."

His son, also called Vyvyan, said: "In common with a lot of people of that generation, a lot of the war experiences only came out later in life.
"He had a quiet wisdom - family came first. He was a wonderful man," he added.

A funeral service for Captain Howard is due to be held at Mollington Parish Church on 30 September.

The Great Escape

Stalag Luft III opened in spring 1942, and held air forces personnel only
At its height it held 10,000 prisoners of war, covered 59 acres and had five miles (8km) of perimeter fencing
Some 600 prisoners helped dig three tunnels, which were referred to as Tom, Dick and Harry
The "Great Escape" happened on the night of 24 to 25 March, 1944
Seventy-six men attempted a getaway through tunnel Harry, which was 102m (336ft) long and 8.5m deep
Seventy-three of them were recaptured by the Germans within three days. Fifty were executed on Hitler's orders
Steve McQueen, James Garner and Richard Attenborough later stared in the film, The Great Escape, released in 1963
Great write up OB
:oops: Cut n pasted from BBC. :|
Great cut and pasting OB :D

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OneBardGooner
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Re: RIP Thread

Post by OneBardGooner »

Thanks mate.

I saw it and it really moved me, and simply re-asserted that those young men (Boys) Who stood and fought for our country in the 2nd world war - were Brave beyond anything I can imagine. Every one of them a Hero in my eyes.

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